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Goody, herself of Dalit heritage, talks about discrimination in India against the Dalits and how, in her first solo exhibition, she is using photographs of her family and turning Dalit literature into recipes, to highlight the significant and complex relationship with food among a people historically denied it
Alison Wilding. Floodlight, 2001. Cast acrylic. Courtesy of
the artist and Karsten Schubert Gallery, London.
With Wilding’s show Right Here and Out There and Peake’s RITE on concurrently at the De La Warr Pavilion in Bexhill, the artists talk about their practice.
Gustav Klimt. Reclining Nude with Drapery, Back View, 1917–1918. Graphite, 14 5/8 x 22 3/8 in (37.1 x 56.8 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Scofield Thayer, 1982.
Stirring and challenging, this frontal look at ecstasy revels in desire as it pits the age-old tradition of nude models against our #MeToo moment.
Patricia Guzman talking to Studio International at the opening of Intersection: International Art and Culture, Arthur M Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University, Beijing, 27 May 2018. Photograph: Martin Kennedy.
Patricia Guzman’s expertly executed realism makes her paintings appear photographic, as she documents faces that attract her sympathy, often closeup.
Thomas Bayrle: Playtime, 2018. Exhibition view, New Museum, New York. Photograph: Maris Hutchinson/EPW Studio.
This major retrospective of the work of Thomas Bayrle brings together works from the past 50 years and throws an unsettling light on the nature of society.
Alex Prager. The Big Valley: Desiree, 2008. © Alex Prager Studio and Lehmann Maupin, New York and
Hong Kong. Courtesy Alex Prager Studio, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong.
Prager revels in cliche and it is clear from the large Technicolor photographs and the handful of films shown here that subtlety holds no interest for her. I am left wondering what it is that she intends to add to the conversation.
Bro Pei talking to Studio International at the opening of Intersection: International Art and Culture, Arthur M Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University, Beijing, 27 May 2018. Photograph: Martin Kennedy.
Bao Pei uses ink and paper in the tradition of Chinese ink painting, but makes her work abstract, and uses knives instead of brushes because she believes the delivery of the ink, the markings, are more forceful that way, conveying greater emotional depth and range.
Tacita Dean Portrait © Jim McHugh.
Centred around the theme of “performance”, this show cleverly connects the art, film and theatre worlds, which cross over not only in Edinburgh’s summer festival lineups, but also in Dean’s work to date.
Ardan Özmenoğlu. Beauty Balloon, 2015. Mixed technique on post-it notes, 95 x 94 cm.  Photograph courtesy Emmanuel Fremin Gallery.
The Turkish artist known for her distinctive works with Post-it notes talks about how she turns them into 3D paintings, her love of repetition, political humour, and her latest project, to turn a soap factory into an art space.
Curator Henry Skerritt and Director Margo Smith.
With more than 1,900 works, the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection at the University of Virginia is the largest collection of Indigenous art in the US. Here, Margo Smith, the director, and Henry Skerritt, the curator, talk about the museum and its work.
Desmond Paul Henry. Untitled. Mechanical pen and ink drawing, Britain, 1964. Given by Elaine O’Hanrahan. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London.
This beautifully curated display includes work from the pioneers of digital art of the 1950s and 60s through to the younger generations practising today.
Christopher Williams. Best.Nr.: 68011, Best.Nr.: 28856, Best.Nr.: 28856. Brushed aluminium – dishwasher safe sauce pan and stew pot. Studio Rhein Verlag, Düsseldorf. 26 January 2017. Inkjet print, 73.7 x 92.2 cm paper. Courtesy the artist, Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne and David Zwirner, New York / London / Hong Kong. © the artist.
In this exhibition, which includes seven photographs and several blank walls, the US photographer investigates systems of meaning and classification.
Ana Mendieta. Sweating Blood, 1973. Super 8 film, colour, silent. Photograph: The Estate of Ana Mendieta Collection, LLC. Courtesy of Galerie Lelong & Co.
Mud, blood, fire and water: a touring exhibition of the Cuban American artist affirms her continuing relevance while revealing her formidable skill as a film-maker.
E.V. Day talking to Studio International at the opening of Intersection: International Art and Culture, Arthur M Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University, Beijing, 27 May 2018. Photograph: Martin Kennedy.
In a riveting, large-scale work called Moss Ball: A Meditation on the Overview Effect (2018), E.V. Day makes some unlikely, and therefore all the more intriguing, connections.
Mark Fox talking to Studio International at the opening of Intersection: International Art and Culture, Arthur M Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University, Beijing, 27 May 2018. Photograph: Martin Kennedy.
Mark Fox, who was brought up as a Catholic, has issues with certain of the religion’s doctrines and belief systems, in what he calls a “love/hate response”.
Tania Kovats (right, photograph © Robin Mills) and Kimathi Donkor (photograph © Kimathi Donkor).
After the pop-up symposium Lines of Thought at Trinity Buoy Wharf, the new partner for what was formerly the Jerwood Drawing Prize, practitioners and educators Tania Kovats and Kimathi Donkor talked about drawing in education and practice today.
Patricia Guzman. Meditations, 2018. Oil on canvas, 100 x 150 cm.
In celebration of its 25th anniversary, the Arthur M Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University has invited 14 artists from around the world to submit work that emphasises the universality of the language of art.
Cybernetic Serendipity: the computer and the arts. Edited by Jasia Reichardt. Published by Studio International (special issue), 1968. © Studio International Foundation.
To mark the 50th anniversary of this pioneering publication and exhibition, Cybernetic Serendipity: The Computer and the Arts has been reprinted and is available to purchase.
Edward Bawden. [Aesop’s Fables] Gnat and Lion, 1970. Colour linocut on paper. Trustees of the Cecil Higgins Art Gallery (The Higgins Bedford), © Estate of Edward Bawden.
The Dulwich Picture Gallery examines the vibrant world of Edward Bawden with a typically joyous exhibition.
VTN Architects. Photograph: Veronica Simpson.
The 16th Architecture Biennale focuses on freespace – in which buildings are engaging, inclusive and accessible to all and use the Earth’s resources wisely. And the curators, Shelley McNamara and Yvonne Farrell, have mostly succeeded in their aim to offer a ‘box of treasures’.
Michael Wang, The Drowned World, 2018. Environmental installation. Photograph: Wolfgang Träger. Courtesy of Manifesta 12, Palermo.
The latest edition of the roving European biennial is a sensitively selected reflection on the nature of power, at once augmented and overwhelmed by its spectacular setting.
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