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The Russian photographer spins gold from the light of desolate places, finding beauty in some unlikely environments
Esther Rolinson: Gravitate.
The multimedia artist Esther Rolinson talks about her exhibition Gravitate at Watermans Art Centre, the allure of light and its qualities as an artistic material, the significance of collaborative work and the incessant movement of her art-making.
Jade  burial  suit  with  gold  thread, Western  Han  (206  BCE –  8  CE), L 176 cm (69 5/16 in), W (shoulder) 68 cm (26 13/16 in); 4,248 pieces of jade, 1,576 g (about 55.6 oz) of gold thread, excavated in 1994–95 from the King of Chu’s tomb at Shizishan. Collection of the Xuzhou Museum. 金缕玉衣,西汉,长176、肩宽68厘米,玉片4248片、金缕1576克,1994–1995年狮子山楚王墓出土,徐州博物馆藏
Willow Hai, director of the China Institute in New York, talks about its current show, Dreams of the Kings, a spectacular collection of treasures from the Han dynasty, including possibly the earliest dated jade burial suit in existence.
Man Ray/Marcel Duchamp. Élevage de poussière, 1920. Gelatin silver print – printed c1968. © Succession Marcel Duchamp/ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2017. © Man Ray Trust/ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London.
A haunting exhibition in which dust plays a divine agent of death.
Yinka Shonibare. Angel (Red). Unique ten colour acrylic screenprint and full colour digital print on canvas, 187 x 140 cm. Courtesy the artist and Stephen Friedman Gallery, London, Photograph: Mark Blower
The RA’s annual open submission exhibition presents a shifting ‘kaleidoscope’ of contemporary art – but what does it show us about art now?.
Isaac Julien. Pas de Deux No. 2 (Looking for Langston Vintage Series), 1989/2016. Kodak Premier print, Diasec mounted on aluminium, 180 x 260 cm (70 7/8 x 102 3/8 in). Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London. © Isaac Julien.
A new exhibition focusing on the Isaac Julien’s hugely significant 1989 film delves into what made this work such a landmark in African-American and queer studies, through a presentation of newly realised photographic works and rare archival material.
Jodie Carey talks to Studio International in her London studio, 6 May 2017. Photograph: Martin Kennedy.
Jodie Carey talks about her developing practice, the impact of motherhood, her concerns with mortality and the fragility of human life, and her redefinition of the monumental.
Fahrelnissa Zeid in her studio, Paris, c1950s. Unknown photographer. Raad Zeid Al-Hussein Collection. 
© Raad Zeid Al-Hussein.
This exhibition tells the story of the irrepressible spirit of a true artistic visionary who has been largely forgotten by art history. Tate Modern hopes to bring Fahrelnissa Zeid’s name to the lips of contemporary art-goers once more.
Cornelia Baltes. Twiste wo ich swinge I, 2015. Acrylic and router on black MDF, powder coated aluminium frame, 69 x 55 cm. Courtesy the artist and Galleri Nicolai Wallner - Breese Little.
Drawing on Peggy Guggenheim’s 1943 exhibition of the same name, 31 Women is a thoroughly relevant and equally captivating and surprising contemporary curation, opening dialogues across time and space.
Shigeru Ban’s design for La Seine Musical kept costs down with the same creamy concrete exterior and interior, but there is one extravagance: the acoustic Auditorium with its moveable sail. Photograph: Didier Boy de la Tour.
Shigeru Ban has landed an ocean liner of a music venue at Paris’s westernmost edge. With two auditoria and a huge amount of public space, it is hoped the €170m building will enrich the city’s music scene and the fortunes of the formerly industrial island in the Seine on which it sits.
Samson Young talks to Studio International at the opening of his show, Songs for Disaster Relief, a collateral event for Hong Kong at the Venice Biennale 2017. Photograph: Martin Kennedy.
Samson Young’s Venice Biennale collateral event for Hong Kong explores the disquieting cocktail of components that comprise the charity single. He talks about the power of music, fake news and what our cultural products say about human nature.
Ida Applebroog. Mercy Hospital, 1969. Ink and watercolour on paper, 35.6 x 27.9 cm (14 x 11 in). © Ida Applebroog. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photograph: Emily Poole.
These drawings from the forgotten sketchbooks of the well-known feminist artist Ida Applebroog offer an intimate insight into her struggle with depression during a six-week stay at Mercy Hospital in 1969.
Tom Burr. Surplus of Myself, installation view, Westfälischer Kunstverein, 10 June – 1 October 2017. Photograph: Thorsten Arendt. Courtesy the artist; Galerie Neu, Berlin and Bortolami, New York.
Running parallel to Münster’s Skulptur Projekte, notions of private and public are unsettled in this playful post-minimal exhibition of new works by American artist Tom Burr.
George Drivas talking to Studio International at the opening of Laboratory of Dilemmas, Greek Pavilion, Venice Biennale 2017. Photograph: Martin Kennedy.
For the 57th Venice Biennale, Greek artist George Drivas offers his customary blend of architecture and film in a narrative video installation that explores the resonances between an ancient story by Aeschylus, involving a group of women seeking asylum, and a 20th-century scientific experiment.
Iván Navarro. Impenetrable Room, 2016. Neon, aluminium, mirror, one-way mirror and electric energy, 72 × 72 × 30 in (182.9 × 182.9 × 76.2 cm). Image courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery. Photograph: Christopher Stach.
The fair is a theatrical display of extravagance, peppered with instantly recognisable works by big names, which it is a joy to stumble across. But there are also rarer treasures, from a previously unseen Andy Warhol sketch to a recently rediscovered set of dinner plates designed by Duncan Grant and Vanessa Bell.
Alice Neel. Harold Cruse, c1950. Oil on canvas, 94 x 55.9 cm (37 x 22 in). Private collection. © The Estate of Alice Neel. Courtesy David Zwirner, New York/London and Victoria Miro, London.
With an uncompromising certainty of vision, Alice Neel paints individuals, capturing not only their physical likeness and inner character, but also the zeitgeist.
Pierre Hughe. After ALife Ahead, installation view, Münster, 2017. © Skulptur Projekte 2017. Photograph: Henning Rogge.
With artificial environments, app-led innovations and a preponderance of site-specific video art, the fifth edition of this 10-yearly project broadens out ideas of public sculpture as never before.
Ailbhe Ní Bhriain: Reports to an Academy, installation view. Courtesy Ailbhe Ní Bhriain and Domobaal. Photograph: Andy Keate.
In her latest film, Cork-based artist Ailbhe Ní Bhriain uses the perpetual ebb and flow of water and clouds to dissolve the physical integrity of highly constructed cultural institutions.
Cristóbal Balenciaga at work, Paris, 1968. Photograph by Henri Cartier-Bresson © Henri Cartier-Bresson, Magnum Photos.
The V&A presents an exhibition exploring the abstract and architectural shapes of Cristóbal Balenciaga’s work in the 1950s and 60s, drawing out connections between his legacy and contemporary fashion designers.
Tadaaki Kuwayama talking to Studio International at the opening of Radical Neutrality at the Mayor Gallery, London, 6 June 2017. Photograph: Martin Kennedy.
Japanese-born artist Tadaaki Kuwayama recounts his refusal to dictate how spectators should view his work, his visual dialogue with Frank Stella, and the desire to void his art of meaning.
Alexander Calder. The Arches, 1959. Sheet metal and paint. 106 × 107 1/2 × 87 in (269.2 × 273.1 × 221 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Howard and Jean Lipman. Photograph: Jill Spalding.
Drawing on its extensive collection, this small but exquisite show floated by the Whitney Museum of American Art presents Alexander Calder’s balancing act as a modernist revolution whose visual vocabulary gave art another dimension.
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